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Sick Kid? Try Pediatric Evisits for These Seven Conditions

Aug 19 2019
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Introducing Mercy Health Pediatric Evisits! You can now treat your child’s non-emergency conditions online.

Sickness seems to strike at inconvenient times, and children are no exception. Following the launch of our Evisit program last year for patients 18 and older, Mercy Health is now offering Evisits for pediatric patients ages two to 17.

Evisits are a fast, affordable and secure way to receive an online diagnosis and treatment plan for common, non-urgent medical conditions. They are online visits with Mercy Health doctors that can be a convenient alternative to a traditional office visit, letting you and your child stay in the comfort of your home.

These seven conditions can be treated with an Evisit: 

  1. Influenza (flu)
  2. Headlice
  3. Pink eye
  4. Constipation
  5. Vomiting and/or diarrhea
  6. Sinus, cold and/or cough
  7. Swimmer’s ear

An Evisit might be right for your child if: 

You want convenient care.

Taking time out of your busy schedule can mean adjustments for the whole family. Sometimes, just leaving your home can be difficult. Removing the need for transportation, the Evisit program opens an additional way for parents to seek care for their children.

Your child is afraid of the doctor.

Betsy Drake, MD, the medical director of the Evisit program and a mother herself, shares, “Some children have a large fear of just walking into a doctor’s office. For a child, an Evisit at home may mean feeling better quickly with less stress for everyone in the family.”

Your child is suffering from a reoccurring ailment.

If your child has reoccurring common illnesses, you might already have a good idea of what’s going on based on the symptoms. Therefore, an Evisit might be a more convenient solution than scheduling an appointment at an office.

“Most of the time, parents know their children if they’ve been through it before,” says Dr. Drake.

You need a quick response.

Our primary care providers respond to Evisits daily from 7 a.m. – 7 p.m. except on Labor Day, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, New Year’s Eve, New Year’s Day, Easter, Memorial Day, and Fourth of July. Evisits requested with the first available provider should expect a response within one hour of submission.

It’s late in the evening or early in the morning.

Parents can also submit an Evisit request at any time of day. Additionally, Dr. Drake notes there are a fair amount of Evisits submitted during the middle of the night.

“Our physicians are working to answer these as early in the day as possible,” she says. “If you submit an Evisit at 4 a.m., you know that within four hours someone will answer you.”

You don’t want to expose your child/other family members to a waiting room.

This is especially true during months when the flu is prevalent. If your child’s illness can be treated by Evisit, it might be the best option to avoid others with more severe illnesses.

Remember, Evisits are for non-urgent medical conditions.

“The pediatric Evisits are for simple, straight forward symptoms. If you have any questions or more serious concerns, schedule a regular office visit,” says Dr. Drake. “Evisits aren’t meant to replace physically seeing your physician if you think that’s the best option.”

Schedule a Pediatric Evisit today! 

To schedule an Evisit, your child must have a MyChart account. Learn more about setting up a MyChart account here.

Once you are in the MyChart account, simply click “Begin an Evisit.” Then, you will be prompted to answer a series of questions. From there, a Mercy Healthy primary care provider will review your answers alongside your child’s medical history. After review, you’ll simply receive a message from your doctor – no online videos or chats are necessary.

To learn more about how Evisits are conducted, click here.  If your child’s condition doesn’t qualify for an Evisit but you still want to see a physician, we’re here for you. Click here to find a doctor near you.


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